Our society is getting more complicated ( “ingewikkeld” in Dutch, as the picture to the left shows) by the day. And yet, we still are looking for ways to simplify things while the total complexitywill certainly not diminish. So we need to accept total complexity as a given and find clever ways to handle it. That is where abstraction comes in as one of the possible tools. It’s a favourite tool used by architects and designers. With abstraction you just hide certain complexity by abstracting it and putting a (virtual) box, domain, layer or whatever you want to call it, around it. Take the PC as an example: a highly complex device, both HW- and SW-wise but the dirty details have been cleverly hidden by it’s designers. So an average user does not need to bother with the internal complexity anymore. He or she can start adding extra new complexity on top of it. But abstracting also has drawbacks: we can loose oversight because we don’t understand the inner working of our black-boxes anymore. If they work, they work oke, but if they fail, we are in trouble.  People who really understand what is happening inside these insane HW/SW ecosystems, accessed by black boxes we call PC’s are getting more and more scarce. And then there is society itself, societal complexity or the way we all interact. It is not so simple to abstract complex social interactions. So maybe in this domain, chaos science can help us a little. Consider The Emergence Principle in the splendid article Living on the Edge: “capable of rising to increasingly higher levels of complexity and order all by themselves“. Sounds like a possible (scientific) solution to handle societal complexity questions. But will it also work in our day-to-day life? The mummy picture originated here.

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